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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i've been fighting for such a plan -- one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade, which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years -- not cou
to the president about past conflicts over the deficit reduction. mark and i were talking about how far back we go. it is a few years. and i remembered him of the earlier sessions that we had. gramm-rudman one and two and gran member holland. i've googled it for all of them. and i was thinking there have been two major changes. number one is the dataset that is clearly much greater. the deficit is much greater. when i think of the ways and means committee, would change their has been in the composition. the ranking member at a time when i started went to the world bank. i worked with bill on trade. he was handling the tax material mainly. and bill was working on health care at the time. i think a second major change is very much effective today and affects us today. it is this change in composition of the republican party. i think it has moved very much more to the right. i think that makes it very difficult to handle the problems that we have before us. let me comment briefly on where we are. you offer the president yesterday. we have had spending cuts of a trillion and a half dollars. it comes f
of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a second trip -- and a secretary. they do not think it is smart to protect and as corporate loopholes and tax breaks for the wealthiest americans rather than rebuild roads and schools or help manufacturers bring jobs back to america. they want us to get our books in order in a balanced way where everyone pulls their weight, everyone does their part. that is what i want as well. that is what i have proposed. we can get it done, but we're going to have to make sure people are looking at this irresponsible way, rather than just
if it is called, then it has to face the economic tasked with value facing 20% and a huge fiscal deficit thanks to the patronage of the last year than you are going to start to see a lot of the chickens come home to roost and see it break apart. this is very similar after -- basically he was forced to engage in a austerity package around 1952 until 55 and that is what basically got him kicked out. and then of course after 1944 he died and you begin to see that internal battle, then you begin to see diffraction happening but not until -- >> that is a perfect segue because i want to bring it back to russell for the question. we talked about politics and about constitution, institutions. we talked about the economy although we've alluded to this aspect to it let me ask you to take off your journalist hat and put on your markets have and ask a simple question is venezuela going to buy, sell or hold? >> i think what we are going to see in the short term is a great deal of turmoil to reverse of markets -- capital flees some certainty. so, right now you have on uncertainty because nobody knows what's
in nearly the past three years, and the whole fiasco added to the deficit. host: after the news conference yesterday, house speaker john boehner responded with this statement -- " what are your thoughts on this? if the debt ceiling negotiable. some quick comments -- remember, you can post your comments on twitter. the first phone call is from maryland, a democratic caller, jill. caller: i don't believe the debt ceiling is negotiable. it is kind of ridiculous that the money is already owed, so why are we not going to pay what is owed to other people? if people have made investments, the bills have to be paid. i find it ridiculous that people in congress don't want to pay what is already owed. it does not make sense. host: here is the wall street journal this morning. caller: well, if you're asking me if that's true, i think there definitely needs to be somewhat of a compromise as far as spending cuts, but that is not an easy issue, because spending cuts mean job losses. it's not an easy thing to say a president will say we will stop paying the bills too. so there has to be compromised rehab
the deficit. so you have to open the door to private investment to do this job of rebuilding the power platform in the united states. >> host: and the technology aspect of that is? >> guest: technology aspect is manifold. and price performance improves every 18-24 mocks. in the last year we have gotten into the innovation cycle in batteries so by the end of 2020 electric vehicles will actually be price competitive with grass-driven cars. the problem with these things is that we can't wait. we can't wait because of the environmental effects and we can't wait because we need the economy to grow quickly right now. so the book lays out a whole bunch of different ideas for bringing private investment much more quickly into the job of rebuilding the power grid. >> host: on this show, a series on the international power plant, and he doesn't necessarily agree that the internet is completely green or is terribly green. what is your thought? >> guest: he is right about that. people say that data centers in the united states account for 2% of all electricity consumption. if it isn't exactly that
be put to use, reducing our deficit or funding critical programs for working americans. on issue after issue after issue, we saw inaction. and what we heard yesterday at the start of this next two years was a call from the president for action. he said in his inaugural speech, "for now, decisions are upon us and we cannot afford delay. we cannot mistake absolutism for prince polar substitute spectacle for -- principle or substitute spectacle for politics or treat name-calling as increased debate." he continued, "we must act knowing that our work will be imperfect. we must act, knowing that today's victories will be only partial." the president echoed, if you will, the thought that he brought into his first four years, the urgency of now. that we have big issues facing america and it's time for the executive branch and the legislative branch to work together to address those issues. well, in this call for action, we must ask: how much action can there be if we see more than a hundred filibusters in the next two years? how much action can there be if on every request for a vote an object
and deficit reduction plan. the debt ceiling and all around it doesn't really solve the problem. it is a waste of time. adam: let me interrupt you because we have had this debt ceiling essentially part of our discussion for almost 100 years, going back to 1917 with the issue of liberty bonds. now today we talk about the debt ceiling and we talk about its impact, this debate for the people who are watching, and, getting to this craziness we see the market reacting in a way you can't anticipate. what would happen to our 401(k) if congress he said they have to get together, i was thinking two words, "good luck." whether they can't do something? >> if they don't raise the debt ceiling and let's say we get debt downgrades, the market has a fit basically and drops as they did in 2011, all our investments will get hit. the stock market will go down as it did in a big way in the summer of 2011. on the other hand, if they extend the limits, the debt ceiling limit and do something more, maybe not a grand compromise, something more in terms of deficit reduction, my guess is the market will kind of shrug
of all, we've had some deficit reduction. the president laid out a couple days ago. we had over $2 # trillion. we had a trillion and a half that came from previous actions, and then we added just a few days ago some further deficit reduction through increased taxes on the very wealthy of this country. we already begun to undertake deficit reduction. to use that as a reason to use the debt ceiling as a weapon is really playing with fire. they say pay some bills and not pay others. we've never tried that before. >> host: is it feasible? >> guest: i don't think so. which bills? social security? veterans? people out fighting for this country? which bills do you pay? we never tried that. i think the president put it so well. this is not a debt beat nation, really, and i think common sense is likely to prevail within the republican ranks. i know, if i might say so, if not firsthand, second hand, that the leadership within the house republican caucus, not all of it, i think some of it realizes that the potential consequences. >> host: if president obama won, so to speak on the fiscal clif
, is look it would add to the deficit whether you were north of south, it doesn't matter. we have only paid for a small amount in terms of offsets for any of these storms. from 2003 to now, in 2003 we had a rule under different circumstances, we had to find some money or find the revenue to pay for it. >> stephanie: right. >> but this is an emergency. we are 80 days into this now. you know how many homes have been damaged and destroyed? i think it's like close to 350,000 homes. >> stephanie: yeah. >> the power outages in new jersey, two -- over 2.5 million no power. i mean i go down the whole list. >> stephanie: right. and it's winter back east encase encase -- in case people haven't noticed. it used to be we are just americans. but look at yesterday, look at yesterday, when there was a tragedy, we used to try to figure out how we come to the table. literally there are people accusing the president of being like saadam hussein, and using children as human shields. >> yeah, they will stop at nothing. we have more ideologues now in the congress than we had in the 112
a conversation about how to redust our deficit let's have that. we've been having that nor the last two years. we just had an entire campaign about it. by the way the american people agreed with me that we should reduce our deficits in a balanced way that takes into account the need for us to grow this economy. martha: bob beckel is former democratic campaign manager and cohost of the five. mary katherine ham is editor at large and fox news contributor. why do you think it was so testy yesterday? >> obama's best form is not necessarily a press conference which is why he does than do many of them. i which he was testy for one real reason. the republicans trying to take the full faith and crucify the united states currency and putting it at fist being. i'd invoke the 14th amendment, we'd problem below know that if we spent more time with the republicans wasting time on the floor of the house. i thought he ought to raise it and to hell with congress. martha: we talked to stewart varney and kirsten said in that sound byte, this isn't about default, people don't think we aren't going to pay the debt o
-interest of the government of venezuela, if you've got a deficit, you know, stop giving oil away. stop subsidizing sales to people. that would be a lodge cl thing -- logical thing to do. and if you had a government that was not as idealogically motivated as the current government, if you had a chavista government not as idealogically motivated as the current government, that would be a real, logical thing for them to do. >> yeah. thank you for those comments. before i go to chris for the last question this round, i want to mention that after that we'll be going to the audience for some of your questions. we'll have circumstance rating microphones, so you can be thinking about the questions. hopefully, the certification to this point has been sufficiently provocative that you'll have a number of questions, and we can go into the procedure for doing that. but just to give you a heads up that that's coming shortly. chris, back to you for really a continuation of where charles left his comments. but i want to press it just a little bit further. you've talked about the democracy side. charles also mentioned
a budget deficit a few years ago, we have a surplus and giving them the authority to do things without as much federal interference as we had in the past will be great. we'll see if that happens. the president has talked about flexibility before and now is the time to make it it happen and he's got willing partners at the state level. if he's willing to help give us that kind of flexibility. >> you said he talked about flexibility before. have you actually seen it and asked for it? >> we have not. it's been asked for not only for governors, but the national governor's association, talking about a need for that. particularly we know there's a difference between republicans controlling the house and democrats controlling the presidency as well as the united states senate and if they ultimately want to get things done, one of the best ways to get things done on behalf the american people is to give that kind of authority back to the governors at the state levels. you've got a good mix of republican and democratic governors out there. part of it is not just about medicaid and spending, it'
to quit spending money and try to cut into this deficit. >> reporter: house republicans see the debt ceiling deadline next month as one of the best ways early in the president's second term to force him to accept a new round of spending cuts and may have it on an incremental basis, one, two o three months and using that process to achieve more deficit reduction. >> former speaker of the house and republican presidential candidate newt gingrich. good morning mr. speaker. >> it's good to be with you. >> good to be with you. you say fighting over the debt ceiling is a bad idea for congressional republicans. why? >> because in the end it's a threat they can't sustain. no one is going to default. no one is going to allow the united states to not pay its bills. no one is going to accept the economic costs. it rallies the entire business community to the president's side and the fact is republicans have two much bet ear renas to fight over spending they have a continuing resolution which funds government which comes up at the end of march and they have the sequester,
control on the budget? on the deficit? >> let me say two things that he can do. i got interrupted for miss alicia keys. i'm sorry. >> today is an incredible day. and you can feel the energy everywhere that you go. in so many ways, every day is a new day. and a new chance. a new chance to be our best. to serve our highest purpose. yeah. so i'm going to need your help tonight because i'm up here all by myself. i just wanted it to be me and you. so help me celebrate this most momentous day. i'll tell you what to do. i need you to say -- ♪ ♪ people say eh ♪ ♪ it's a new day ♪ it's a new day ♪ getting ready, everybody ready ♪ ♪ eh oh, a new day ♪ a new day ♪ celebrate and say eh, eh ♪ celebrate and say eh ♪ yeah because he's president and he's on fire. hotter than a fab as they like a highway ♪ ♪ he's living in a world and it's on fire filled with catastrophe ♪ ♪ he has both feet on the ground and he's burning it down ♪ ♪ oh, oh got his head in the crowds and he's not breaking down ♪ ♪ he's walking on fire ♪ obama's on fire ♪ watch him as he's lightin
spending cuts in order to get the deficit under control and there are a lot of people, including the head of the imf who say look at europe's example to say america, don't go too far, you could slow growth down to the point it doubles down on itself. it starts to make things worse because more people are out of work, not paying taxes, they become recipients of government aid and you're not generating economic growth, the kind that creates jobs, so i think that will be one focus. the other focus is trust. does anybody trust anybody anymore? do we trust our governments to make the right decisions, our employers to make the right decision? i hope i have more time to talk about it in between the swarees. >> i trust alli, and i trust yo. what is the one thing i need to know about my money? >> you need to know home sales and home prices are forecast to rise this year. deutsche bank's chief economist says 2013 will be the year of the house. >> really? >> and zillow says that home prices will rise. the year of the house. >> is that between the year of the rat and the year of the dragon. >>> 25 mi
deficits, but acknowledging the realities of divided government, said, quote, today's victories will only be partial. cheryl? cheryl: peter barnes of course standing by at the white house, big day in d.c., cold day as well. peter thank you. well, while most of the markets are closed today, money is still moving. now is your chance to make money on currencies. joining me now for a fox business exclusive interview is forex.com senior currency strategist. welcome. currency markets are moving today. currency is a bit of great interest with regards to the european currencies and there's japan. big meeting today, bank of japan, more concern about deflation in that country, what is your reading right now on the country of japan and the yen in particular? >> they have been taking some pretty extraordinary measures over the past to months or so -- past two months or so. been very very aggressive in terms of easing the japanese yen. he believes that's going to be the major thing to turn around the japanese economy. cheryl: i mean it's almost a currency war, if you will. i mean they are getting into
disproportionately locally driven. cities cannot run budget deficits, so what happens when you something like the great recession. cities all over the country having to scale back if they can't find the budget deficit. that's what you don't want to do this, local employment during an economic downturn. >> even the fiscal cliff to be right about now. >> this is a huge thing. justice program provides grants to law enforcement to hire more police. that program could easily be 20 or 30 times its billion dollars figure size. it would be one of the most productive things the federal government could do to make progress in this area. >> we agree 18 what the professor outlined in the latter part of what he said is to go after illegal gun market among law-abiding people. we're talking about felons on gun violence from the people engaged gun sales illegal under any interpretation of the law. and go after people with records carrying guns illegally. that's been done in cooperation with u.s. attorney in chicago. it's been reasonably good. they think the important thing is to find ways to go after crimina
states right now is very disproportionately chirping. cities cannot and budget deficits. what happens when you something like the great recession quite cities all over the country having to scale back because they can't run budget deficits. exactly which you don't want to do a scaled-back local employment during the economic downturn. this is a huge thing. the department of justice program provides grants to local law enforcement to hire more police. the program could easily be 20 or 30 times its billion dollars a year size. it would be one of the most productive things the federal government could do to make progress in this area. >> we agree. i think what the professor just outlined in the latter part of what he said is go after illegal gun markets. were talking about people balanced or selling guns to felons, people engaged in gun sales that are illegal under any interpretation of the law and go after criminal people with records who are carrying guns illegally. that's been done in cooperation in chicago. i think the important thing is to find ways to go after the criminals here. b
support the idea that the deficit ought not to be a political football that, by becoming that does damage to our economy. so we would clearly, we want to see the debt ceiling sort of removed from the process of the very important debates that we have over what we pay for, how much revenue we bring in, how we get our fiscal house in order in a way that helps the economy grow. >> and chris stirewalt is our politics digital editor and house of power play on foxnews.com live. and this is a clever way to get the senate democrats to do their job. >> sneaky pete. and the idea is it does two things, gets the republicans on what they would rather fight with the president about. continuing resolution funding the government, number one and two, the automatic cuts, they call the sequester that are part of the 2011 debt ceiling deal. they want to address those, because they think that they can use those more efficaciously without harming the economy than with the debt ceiling kicking it down the road a few months and say that is a nuclear option kind of thing in the end and getting the president to yi
this. yes, it may run up the immediate deficit, but once again, for every dollar that we invest in those levees we not only save lives and property, but we put people to work and we get the economic engine going. further up in my district, again, along the sacramento and the rivers, i have a project that's 44 miles of levee that clearly will fail. it has failed four times in the last 60 years. lives have been lost. one of the most catastrophic failures of a levee happened in this stretch of river. we need to rebuild that. the federal government's role in these construction projects of these levees has gone back to the very beginning of this nation and it is congress' task to allocate the money to decide the projects that are going to be built. but unfortunately we tied ourselves in knots here with certain rules that have been put in by our republican colleagues that prevent us from taking the necessary action to protect our communities. we're not talking about, you know, willy nily unnecessary projects. we're talking about saving -- nilly unnecessary projects. we're talking abou
our debt to g.d.p., our deficit to g.d.p. down around 3%, which is the basis of all economists left, right and center all agree on the areas we can begin to grow as a country. and as my grandfather used to say with grace of god and goodwill of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. unanimitydon't have in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is a need to r
they need to put inshunes on a gun like you do a car. host: so often we focus on the u.s. debt or deficit, we have exceeded now the dealt limit of $16.4 trillion. you can see in the upper left-hand side the debt clock. difficult choices on the debt if the u.s. think it's ceiling. the piece points out by mid february or early march the united states could face an unprecedented default unless it raises the debt ceiling. that was from tim geithner. further into the body of the "new york times" story i want to is share with you some of the numbers "the new york times" points out today. that could happen as early as february 15, if that happens by february 15 or early march, according to the by partisan policy center in analysis of what the government expects is $8 billion in revenue that day but it has $52 billion in spending that day, $6.8 billion in tax refunds, $3.5 in federal salaries, and $1.5 ode to military contractors and other commitments. consider again that day on february 15 f that is the day we reach the limit, the country would not have enough money to pay the bond holders let a
veer -- inadvertently did not disclose information, you are put at a credibility deficit with the public, and sometimes it is hard to dig out of that. it is very difficult for organizations, especially in a crisis response, to think about just releasing the information before it's asked for and remove that deficit. i've been involved in several situations where the information was available and the information was understandable and probably mitigated some of the concerns, but because of the way the companies in the government work, it was difficult to make that transparent and then catching up with that with the american public is really, really difficult. nancy and marcia, we had talked about this with jay a lot. one of the problems we have in mental anguishing impacts -- measuring the impacts of the spill in the gulf is the lack of the background of the presence of hydrocarbons as a baseline for understanding there had been a change. in the context of moving beyond the direct aims of the research that's going to be conducted with the bp money, what do you think the lar
to finance the government deficit, buying a lot of government bonds and at some point that is going to come apart and it might come apart, might come apart in a fashion that is rather like august of 2007 where things seem to be going smoothly and then all of a sudden it all falls apart and the question is do we have adequate contingency plans in place should that happen? >> right. >> i fear we do not. >> before we let you go, when these transcripts come out do they evoke any memories for you good or bad about these meetings? >> oh, well they evoke lots of memories. i haven't seen the transcripts of course. i look forward to reviewing it because that was my last full year in office. it was a wonderful experience to be there. i learned an awful lot. and certainly one of the things i reflect on is the various points that we missed that i missed and my colleagues missed. >> william poole, former st. louis fed president, thank you so much for your time. steve, thanks to you for sticking around. >> my pleasure. >> meantime morgan stanley trading sharply higher after reporting results this morning
the deficit, let your member of congress know. if you believe we can solve this problem through compromise, send that message. america, after all, has always been a grand experiment in compromise. >> one thing i will not compromise over is whether or not congress should pay the tab for a bill they already racked up. if congress refuses to give the united states the ability to pay its bills on time, the consequences for the entire global economy could be catastrophic. the last time they threatened this course of action our entire economy suffered for it. >> all right. the trajectory of the perspective of compromise. >> that's entertaining but i think a i have a little bit of minority opinion. some of it is a bit overstated. in you're preamble setting this up. to assume that when the president was delivering that speech in 2009, that he did not understand just how difficult the road ahead would be and just how much recess substance he would get from the other party. i think, understates the sophistication that this man has about politics and he knew what the moment was in 2009. i think that
as conservatives would not support so it's alarming in a sense. he did make one reference to the deficit but offered no proposal for how he was going to relieve it. in terms of the divisiveness he referred to name calling and spectacle and so forth and you didn't get the sense he was pointing to both his own party and his opposition. it seemed like he was pointing fingers at the republicans, that's not a good start. >> peter sprigg, senior fellow at policy studies for the family research council. nice to have you with us this morning. we appreciate your time. >>> still ahead a scandal that was sex, lies and e-mails, brought down the cia director and a war hero. now the other woman in the story, jill kelley is talking and telling her side of her own story. howie kurtz will join us with that. >>> making history becoming routine for supreme court justice sonia sotomayor. part two of my interview with the first hispanic supreme court justice is just ahead. email marketing from constant contact reaches people in a place they're checking every day -- their inbox. and it gives you the tools to
the debt limit with deficit reduction. nothing could be further from the truth. in the past three decades the only thing that has worked in washington to get the spending under control is to tie debt spending to a limit. gramm-rudman. it is a tool that can and should be used. >>gretchen: he seems to think it has nothing to do with spending. what would be your counter to that? >> it has everything to do with spending. again, it's been the most effective tool to be used to try to get washington to finally begin to tighten its belt and do the right thing. if we don't, the country does become bankrupt. some would grew it already -- some would argue it already is, as we saw in that hbo -- hank paulson looked good. >>gretchen: he wasn't playing himself. unfortunately we're out of time, but this discussion could go on and on. >> the american people want us to deal with this issue, and this has been the time and place to do it. we ought to do it in the next few weeks. >>gretchen: senator, great to see you. more "fox & friends" more "fox & friends" straight ahead.t jack's cereal. [ jack ] what's f
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)